Lake Union Events: Things to Do in May

Get ready to enjoy some fun, food and music events this May in South Lake Union!

All May: Chandler’s Crabfest
Get your fill of crab this month at Chandler’s Crabhouse in South Lake Union! The restaurant’s crabfest lasts all May, with 10 different menu items priced $40 and under. There are five different types of crab, with 12 different preparations – enjoy and explore!

Throughout May: Pasta Classes at Cuoco
6:30pm – 9pm | Cuoco
Learn pasta making technique, recipes and more at Cuoco throughout May, with three fun pasta classes! After instruction and hands-on demonstration, enjoy a 3-course family dinner, plus wine and a take-home portion of your pasta. The cost is $65 per person. For more information, please contact Scott Whited or call 206.971.0710. Classes are on May 2nd, May 9th, and May 16th.

May 4: First Free Thursday at MOHAI
10am – 8pm | Museum of History and Industry
On the first Thursday of the month, May 4th, the Museum of History and Industry offers free general admission for the museum’s permanent exhibits – all day long! The free admission includes: True Northwest: the Seattle Journey, and the Bezos Center for Innovation.

May 11: Family Reunion: Chuckanut and Pfreim Brewery Dinner
6:30pm – 9pm | Brave Horse Tavern
Brave Horse Tavern’s annual Seattle Beer Week dinner is reuniting Pfreim Family Brewers and Chuckanut Brewing for a delicious brewery dinner on May 11th! Brave Horse’s Chef Brian is working up a menu to compliment the beers from these two great breweries. The cost is $60 per person. Call 206-971-0717 to reserve your spot!

May 13: Seattle Makers Market
11am – 5pm | 400 Fairview Avenue
Visit the ground floor of the Market Hall at 400 Fairview on Saturday, May 13th for the monthly Seattle Makers Market series! This free event features handmade goods from crafters, artists, makers and artisans in the Seattle area.

May 14: Mother’s Day Brunch
10am – 3pm | Chandler’s Crabhouse
Happy Mother’s Day! Head to Chandler’s Crabhouse on Mother’s Day to enjoy a complete brunch. For $39 per person, the prix-fixe brunch includes your choice of a starter and entree. Add-ons are available, such as a Crab Cocktail Trio, USDA Filet Mignon, or Alaskan King Crab. Chandler’s also offers a couple of kid-friendly options.

May 18: Third Thursday Lecture Series: Exploring Big Ideas – Health
7pm – 9pm | SLU Discovery Center
First Church of Christ, Scientist Michelle Nanouche will be doing a talk for the Third-Thursday Lecture Series: Exploring Big Ideas – Health A Talk, titled “Finding God, Finding Health.”

May 20: Herbs & Spirits Class at Cicchetti
1pm – 3pm | Cicchetti
Cicchetti is hosting a fun workshop on May 20th, featuring herbs and spirits for liqueurs, liquors, and more. You’ll learn how to capture the essence of garden herbs as you make four cocktails – each paired with delicious dishes. The cost is $80 per person, not including tax or gratuity. Reservations are required: 206-323-0807.

May 26: Back to Bach by Emerald City Music
8pm – 11pm | 415 Westlake
This music event, Back to Bach, examines Bach’s influence on Western music, from percussion to piano and everything in between. Musicians from Lincoln Center, the Curtis Institute and other groups will be performing in a relaxed atmosphere. The cost is $45 (students only $10 admission), and includes an open bar.

Seattle City Council Approves Re-Zoning SLU for Taller Buildings

By Monica Nickelsburg

The Seattle City Council voted to increase building heights in the South Lake Union and downtown neighborhoods Monday (April 10th). It’s the second upzone that South Lake Union has seen in the past five years.

The upzone allows for buildings with an additional one to five stories. In exchange for taller buildings, developers will be required to build at least 2.1 percent affordable, income-restricted units or pay fees to the city that will go toward nonprofits that focus on affordable housing. If developers take the fee option, there’s no guarantee that the housing it funds will be built in South Lake Union or downtown.

The program is an extension of Mayor Ed Murray’s Mandatory Housing Affordability (MHA) plan to all of South Lake Union and a significant portion of downtown. It was a point of some contention during the City Council meeting Monday. Councilmember Lisa Herbold proposed an amendment that would increase the mandatory affordable housing to 5 percent, but it was voted down by the council.

South Lake Union has undergone a dramatic transformation in the past decade driven by the growth of Amazon, which is headquartered there. But it’s not just Amazon — Seattle’s booming technology industry is drawing record numbers of newcomers to the region, creating traffic and affordability issues around downtown.

The City hopes this legislation will reduce congestion by encouraging more people to live near their offices and alleviate some of the housing affordability issues longtime residents are facing.

“This legislation that we’re about to pass today really does set the city on a new path and a new course of requiring all construction in the city, whether it’s commercial or residential, to contribute to affordable housing,” said Councilmember Tim Burgess during the meeting. “We’ve never had a mandatory program like this.”

The upzone stems from the mayor’s Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA), a plan aimed at adding 50,000 new homes in Seattle over the next decade, 20,000 of which would be reserved for low- and middle-income residents.

Syndicated from GeekWire.com

Bertha Finally Breaks Through in South Lake Union

Bertha has broken into daylight.

The giant tunnel machine chewed through the side of the disassembly vault at South Lake Union about 11:25 a.m. Tuesday, after an overnight stoppage at the concrete head wall.

Bertha arrived at the tunnel’s north portal 29 months late and four years after launching in Sodo to dig the highway tube that will replace the earthquake-damaged Alaskan Way Viaduct.

The 57-foot, 4-inch wide rotating cutter, moving north on a slight upward slope, gradually pushed concrete chunks forward as it nosed through the lower part of the concrete wall.

Bertha breaks through

Despite sprinklers raining water into in the vault, thick dust filled the area and drove media and officials witnessing the event into an enclosed area.

On Monday, Joe Hedges, project administrator for the Washington State Department of Transportation, couldn’t stop smiling as he complimented the contractors, WSDOT’s oversight team, and said Washington residents should be proud the long dig was accomplished.

“To remind everybody what’s been done in the last 11 months, (they’ve) tunneled over 1.5 miles, with just amazing results, underneath the heart of the city, tunneling a five-story tunnel,” Hedges said.

Though the state and Seattle Tunnel Partners are fighting in court over a half-billion dollars in repair and delay costs, STP has also created goodwill by cruising at 40 or even 50 feet a day since passing beneath the old Alaskan Way Viaduct last April 29.

Hedges noted that much work is left to be done before the tunnel opens to traffic in early 2019.

“We’re not at the fourth quarter, we’re only at about halftime,” he said.

Crews must complete the underground double-decker highway, with two lanes going north and two going south.

There was no public access to the site, just west of Aurora Avenue. WSDOT has installed an online vault cam and is tweeting under the hashtag #Berthabreakthrough.

STP manager Chris Dixon and state officials kept saying there won’t be much spectacle. Public interest has grown anyway. Banners of Tutor-Perini and Dragados USA, the major tunneling partners, have been hung over the wall for infrastructure sponsors worldwide to notice.

Gov. Jay Inslee and Mayor Ed Murray, along with other elected officials and WSDOT leaders, were on hand for the breakthrough.

The governor acknowledges his tunnel frustrations from the 29-month delay. During a long repair stoppage in 2015, he told KIRO radio host Dori Monson that a homeowner in similar straits would whip a late contractor “like a cheap mule.”

But Inslee said last week the technology is equally memorable, and he looks forward to watching the breakthrough.

He recalled a visit early in the project, feeling like he was in a Star Wars film.

“When you stand in the tunnel, it’s five to six stories tall. It’s mind-boggling. When you go into the control room, you feel like you’re in the Millennium Falcon control room.”

Inslee also warned the state has far to go. “We’re still in a race against the next earthquake, to take the viaduct down,” he said.

Murray sponsored the 2009 tunnel legislation when he was a state senator, shortly after Gov. Chris Gregoire chose to build a single-bore, deep highway to replace the earthquake-damaged viaduct.

As mayor, Murray said, he’s had little influence over the tunnel job because it’s not only a state contract but a design-build contract in which STP does final engineering and takes on the financial risks.

He admits there were times he wasn’t sure Bertha would make it.

“Because of the way the design-build contract works, we, the city didn’t have insight into what the issue was,” Murray said. “For a while there it was unclear what was going to happen.”

He said the waterfront revival, after the viaduct is gone, “is going to capture the imagination of the city.”

Responsibility for cost overruns may take years to be settled.

Rep. Ed Orcutt, R-Kalama, last week sought to revive the issue with a bill that would withhold state revenue sharing for transportation, liquor and marijuana-related health programs, and municipal courts unless Seattle pays any future cost overruns.

The 2009 legislation said excess state costs would be borne by property owners who benefit, and “a promise is a promise,” Orcutt argues.

Murray said of that concept: “I really don’t think, if you’re a Republican legislator or a Democratic legislator, you want your local city or county to pay for state roads. I think that would be an unbelievable way to go.”

Syndicated from The Seattle Times

Lake Union Events: Things to Do in April

There’s lots happening with food and fun throughout April in Lake Union! Check out these Lake Union events…

All April: Edible City Month
MOHAI celebrates the culture of food with Edible City Month in April. Experience a month of culinary exploration in this city-wide salute to Seattle’s innovative urban palate. Unique culinary events and programs will take place across the city April 1-30, including book signings, a live broadcast of KIRO radio’s Seattle Kitchen with Tom Douglas and Thierry Rautureau, a food science fair, and more. In addition, diners are invited to collect receipts from participating restaurants and establishments to unlock special museum pricing to see Edible City: A Delicious Journey.

April 6: First Free Thursday at MOHAI
10am – 8pm | Museum of History and Industry
On the first Thursday of the month, April 6th, the Museum of History and Industry offers free general admission for the museum’s permanent exhibits – all day long! The free admission includes: True Northwest: the Seattle Journey, and the Bezos Center for Innovation.

April 8: Seattle Makers Market
11am – 5pm | 400 Fairview Ave N
Seattle-area artists, crafters, makers, and artisans will display their work for sale from 11am until 5pm on Saturday, April 8th. The Seattle Makers Market is a not-for-profit arts group dedicated to providing space and opportunity for local artists, artisans, and makers to showcase and sell their work, and to create and encourage a thriving and diverse community of artists and makers in the Puget Sound area and beyond.

April 9: Cast Off! Free Public Sail
10am – 5pm | Center for Wooden Boats
Take a sail in classic wooden boats during this free event! The Center for Wooden Boats is hosting a free public sail on Sunday, April 9th. Rides last approximately 45 minutes and can be reserved throughout the day. Space is limited and rides fill quickly, so arrive early to sign up.

April 13: Seattle Kitchen Live at MOHAI
7pm – 8:30pm | Museum of History and Industry
Tom Douglas and Thierry Rautureau, two esteemed Seattle chefs, bring their long-running Seattle Kitchen radio show to MOHAI. See their conversation in action, as they discuss, argue, and laugh about a broad range of topics connected to the city’s food scene. Cost: $15 MOHAI members / $20 public.

April 16: Easter Brunch at Serafina
9:30am – 2:30pm | Serafina
Serafina is hosting a two-course brunch menu in celebration of Easter! Look for seasonal offerings including rhubarb, fava beans and local cherries. Patio seating will be offered if the weather is agreeable. The brunch is $35 per person (not including gratuity or tax), plus a kids menu for $12/child. Make your reservation: 206-323-0807.

April 22: Edible City Science Fair
10am – 4pm | Museum of History and Industry
Celebrate Earth Day at MOHAI by investigating the science behind food, farming, and sustainability at the Edible City Science Fair. Enjoy hands-on displays, demonstrations, as well as activities with community groups and organizations from across Washington State. Discover some of the latest innovations in food science! The science fair is open to visitors (and exhibitors!) of all ages. Free for members; included with museum admission.

April 29: Tequila – Not Just Salt & Lime Cocktail Class
1pm – 3pm | Serafina
Explore the history of tequila from Mexican tradition, through Spanish distillation techniques and methods for aging in this fun class from Serafina and Cicchetti. You’ll learn how fine agave spirits are made, styles available and cocktail-crafting tips. Four cocktails will be paired with dishes. Cost is $80 per person (not including gratuity or tax). Reservations required.

South Lake Union Rezone Approved by Council Committee

A Seattle City Council committee took a step forward Tuesday in rezoning South Lake Union, Lower Queen Anne, and Downtown neighborhoods.

The Council’s Planning, Land Use, and Zoning committee voted 3-0 to forward the legislation, which would allow taller building heights in exchange for affordable housing.

Councilmember Lisa Herbold expressed her concerns on the equation used to determine the heights and suggested she could provide amendments in the future.

As crafted, the legislation would allow buildings up to 40 feet taller than the current code, depending on the amount of affordable market units within the building.

Councilmember Rob Johnson, who chairs the committee and presided over multiple amendments, acknowledged there will likely be changes to the legislation before a full Council vote on April 10.

Syndicated from King5 News.