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Lake Union

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By Monica Nickelsburg

The Seattle City Council voted to increase building heights in the South Lake Union and downtown neighborhoods Monday (April 10th). It’s the second upzone that South Lake Union has seen in the past five years.

The upzone allows for buildings with an additional one to five stories. In exchange for taller buildings, developers will be required to build at least 2.1 percent affordable, income-restricted units or pay fees to the city that will go toward nonprofits that focus on affordable housing. If developers take the fee option, there’s no guarantee that the housing it funds will be built in South Lake Union or downtown.

The program is an extension of Mayor Ed Murray’s Mandatory Housing Affordability (MHA) plan to all of South Lake Union and a significant portion of downtown. It was a point of some contention during the City Council meeting Monday. Councilmember Lisa Herbold proposed an amendment that would increase the mandatory affordable housing to 5 percent, but it was voted down by the council.

South Lake Union has undergone a dramatic transformation in the past decade driven by the growth of Amazon, which is headquartered there. But it’s not just Amazon — Seattle’s booming technology industry is drawing record numbers of newcomers to the region, creating traffic and affordability issues around downtown.

The City hopes this legislation will reduce congestion by encouraging more people to live near their offices and alleviate some of the housing affordability issues longtime residents are facing.

“This legislation that we’re about to pass today really does set the city on a new path and a new course of requiring all construction in the city, whether it’s commercial or residential, to contribute to affordable housing,” said Councilmember Tim Burgess during the meeting. “We’ve never had a mandatory program like this.”

The upzone stems from the mayor’s Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA), a plan aimed at adding 50,000 new homes in Seattle over the next decade, 20,000 of which would be reserved for low- and middle-income residents.

Syndicated from GeekWire.com

There’s lots happening with food and fun throughout April in Lake Union! Check out these Lake Union events…

All April: Edible City Month
MOHAI celebrates the culture of food with Edible City Month in April. Experience a month of culinary exploration in this city-wide salute to Seattle’s innovative urban palate. Unique culinary events and programs will take place across the city April 1-30, including book signings, a live broadcast of KIRO radio’s Seattle Kitchen with Tom Douglas and Thierry Rautureau, a food science fair, and more. In addition, diners are invited to collect receipts from participating restaurants and establishments to unlock special museum pricing to see Edible City: A Delicious Journey.

April 6: First Free Thursday at MOHAI
10am – 8pm | Museum of History and Industry
On the first Thursday of the month, April 6th, the Museum of History and Industry offers free general admission for the museum’s permanent exhibits – all day long! The free admission includes: True Northwest: the Seattle Journey, and the Bezos Center for Innovation.

April 8: Seattle Makers Market
11am – 5pm | 400 Fairview Ave N
Seattle-area artists, crafters, makers, and artisans will display their work for sale from 11am until 5pm on Saturday, April 8th. The Seattle Makers Market is a not-for-profit arts group dedicated to providing space and opportunity for local artists, artisans, and makers to showcase and sell their work, and to create and encourage a thriving and diverse community of artists and makers in the Puget Sound area and beyond.

April 9: Cast Off! Free Public Sail
10am – 5pm | Center for Wooden Boats
Take a sail in classic wooden boats during this free event! The Center for Wooden Boats is hosting a free public sail on Sunday, April 9th. Rides last approximately 45 minutes and can be reserved throughout the day. Space is limited and rides fill quickly, so arrive early to sign up.

April 13: Seattle Kitchen Live at MOHAI
7pm – 8:30pm | Museum of History and Industry
Tom Douglas and Thierry Rautureau, two esteemed Seattle chefs, bring their long-running Seattle Kitchen radio show to MOHAI. See their conversation in action, as they discuss, argue, and laugh about a broad range of topics connected to the city’s food scene. Cost: $15 MOHAI members / $20 public.

April 16: Easter Brunch at Serafina
9:30am – 2:30pm | Serafina
Serafina is hosting a two-course brunch menu in celebration of Easter! Look for seasonal offerings including rhubarb, fava beans and local cherries. Patio seating will be offered if the weather is agreeable. The brunch is $35 per person (not including gratuity or tax), plus a kids menu for $12/child. Make your reservation: 206-323-0807.

April 22: Edible City Science Fair
10am – 4pm | Museum of History and Industry
Celebrate Earth Day at MOHAI by investigating the science behind food, farming, and sustainability at the Edible City Science Fair. Enjoy hands-on displays, demonstrations, as well as activities with community groups and organizations from across Washington State. Discover some of the latest innovations in food science! The science fair is open to visitors (and exhibitors!) of all ages. Free for members; included with museum admission.

April 29: Tequila – Not Just Salt & Lime Cocktail Class
1pm – 3pm | Serafina
Explore the history of tequila from Mexican tradition, through Spanish distillation techniques and methods for aging in this fun class from Serafina and Cicchetti. You’ll learn how fine agave spirits are made, styles available and cocktail-crafting tips. Four cocktails will be paired with dishes. Cost is $80 per person (not including gratuity or tax). Reservations required.

A Seattle City Council committee took a step forward Tuesday in rezoning South Lake Union, Lower Queen Anne, and Downtown neighborhoods.

The Council’s Planning, Land Use, and Zoning committee voted 3-0 to forward the legislation, which would allow taller building heights in exchange for affordable housing.

Councilmember Lisa Herbold expressed her concerns on the equation used to determine the heights and suggested she could provide amendments in the future.

As crafted, the legislation would allow buildings up to 40 feet taller than the current code, depending on the amount of affordable market units within the building.

Councilmember Rob Johnson, who chairs the committee and presided over multiple amendments, acknowledged there will likely be changes to the legislation before a full Council vote on April 10.

Syndicated from King5 News.

Downtown Seattle and South Lake Union are the next neighborhoods where Mayor Ed Murray wants to allow taller buildings in exchange for help with affordable housing.

Under the proposed upzone, new projects would be allowed to climb one or several stories higher, depending on location. In some cases, projects would be allowed more floor area.

Photo source: Wikipedia Commons

But the Pike Place Market and Pioneer Square historic districts would be exempted from the changes, which the council’s land-use committee will take up Tuesday.

The upzone would trigger the city’s new Mandatory Housing Affordability program, which requires developers to include rent-controlled units in their projects or pay fees to help create such units elsewhere.

That program already is coming to the University District because the council voted to upzone that neighborhood last month.

Murray will ask the council to upzone more than two dozen additional neighborhoods later this year and next year.

He says the program’s goal is to create 6,000 rent-controlled units over 10 years.

In downtown and South Lake Union, housing developers would need to make about 2 to 5 percent of their units rent-controlled or pay fees of $5.50 to $13 per square foot.

Commercial developers would need to devote about 5 to 11 percent of their gross floor area to rent-controlled units or pay fees of $8 to $16 per square foot.

The affordable-housing requirements proposed for downtown and South Lake Union are lower than those proposed for other neighborhoods.

That’s because high-rise buildings are particularly expensive to construct and because the zoning changes would be more incremental there than in other neighborhoods, Murray administration officials say.

It’s also because some downtown and South Lake Union zones already require developers to provide benefits such as public open space and street improvements, officials say.

Despite the lower affordable-housing requirements, Murray administration officials say downtown and South Lake Union would generate as many as 2,100 rent-controlled units.

Where those would be located is another story. Most developers in downtown and South Lake Union would likely choose to pay fees rather than include units in their buildings.

The city would use the fees to help nonprofit developers build rent-controlled housing. Those projects could be in downtown and South Lake Union or could be in other neighborhoods.

Officials say fees are valuable because they can be combined with other financing to create more affordable housing.

If the council approves the upzone, the developer of a 44-story apartment building might be required to include 25 rent-controlled units or pay $5 million in fees.

The developer of a 35-story commercial building might be required to include 74 rent-controlled units or pay $7.8 million in fees.

Since 2001, the city has operated an incentive-zoning program in parts of downtown and South Lake Union. Under that program, developers can choose to build affordable housing or pay fees in exchange for more floor area.

If the council approves the upzone, Murray’s new, mandatory program would replace the existing, voluntary program.

The downtown and South Lake Union upzone may prove less controversial than those proposed for neighborhoods such as Wallingford, Othello and South Park, which would allow larger apartment buildings and convert some blocks now zoned exclusively for single-family, detached homes.

Syndicated from The Seattle Times.

Central atrium inside Allen Institute.  Photo: Anthony Bolante/Puget Sound Business Journal

Science, art, and efficiency integrate seamlessly, not unlike our own left and right brains, in the architecture and structure of The Allen Institute building, located near the southwest bank of Lake Union. The large, LED-driven installation on the exterior façade, which is based upon neural brain activity and perception, transitions between colors and layered images. And among other unique building features is the engineering marvel of corralling existing mineral springs so a building could reliably stand on the site. The Allen Institute at 615 Westlake Ave. N. encompasses three entities: the Allen Institute for Brain Science, Allen Institute for Cell Science and Paul G. Allen Frontiers.

Allen Institute exterior. Photo: Lara Swimmer Photography

According to Puget Sound Business Journal, philanthropist Paul Allen’s 270,000 square foot, 7-story building has now won two awards from Engineering News-Record: ENR Northwest’s “Project of the Year” and Best “Higher Education/Research” project. Only 20 real estate developments were given commendations this year for any “Best of the Best” category. The two awards mentioned were given to the Allen Institute, in ENR’s words, “for achieving the promise of a collaborative concept, overcoming dewatering and structural challenges, and preserving a historical site.”

Dewatering? Structural challenges? What historical site? Well, “dewatering” refers to the mineral springs mentioned earlier; they bubbled up during initial excavation, which had to be addressed so the structure of the building wouldn’t buckle. Especially since the P4 parking garage is 34 feet below water level. Through a series of dewatering wells built during construction and careful monitoring over time of water pressure on shoring walls (more than 100 of them), the team was able to determine that the structure would hold. Because of a clever treatment system that filters the ground water so efficiently that it is released into Lake Union cleaner than the actual lake water, the WA Department of Ecology approved it.

Looking east toward Lake Union.

The integrity of the former Ford and Pacific McKay car showrooms on-site, designated as a historic landmark, needed to be considered. Pioneer Masonry catalogued, disassembled, and stored any protected components from the buildings, especially the terra-cotta façade which was later reassembled using a virtual 3D model made previously. The new building was built to wrap around the older ones.

The new Allen Institute building wraps around historic car showrooms.

The interior of the facility has interesting features as well. Studio SC built the external public artwork called “Pathways” that adorns the exterior, but also provided wayfinding graphics/ signage within the building. The central atrium of the building is built to promote easy access between labs and offices, between co-workers in different departments. The excess heat produced by the data center, which stores a huge amount of information, is effectively re-routed to provide heating and cooling for the building. Besides the data center, the institute also has wet and dry labs, an electron microscopy area, auditorium, and a center for education.

Studio SC’s public art installation “Pathways”, exterior.  Photo: Lara Swimmer Photography

Paul Allen, who initially made his fortune as co-founder of Microsoft, began this non-profit in 2003 to study the workings of the brain in an “open science” model (greatly simplified, meaning easier access to scientific knowledge and research). An interesting link to explore, the Allen Brain Atlas, gives a peek into the depth of what is studied here.

 

Owner/Developer: Vulcan Inc.
General Contractor: GLY
Lead Design/Architect Firm: Perkins+Will
Subcontractors: BOLA Architecture + Planning; Candela; Sparling; Coughlin Porter Lundeen; McKinstry; Affiliated Engineers NW; Valley Electric; GeoEngineers; Pioneer Masonry

Dine Around Seattle returned for 2017 on Sunday, March 5th, and a couple of SLU restaurants are participating! Dine Around Seattle is a little bit more fun than Seattle Restaurant Week, in that the restaurant isn’t limited to the three-course prix-fixe format of appetizer, entree, and dessert. Instead, Dine Around Seattle allows a little bit more flexibility, so that the restaurants can show off the things that they specialize in. After all, Dine Around Seattle is intended to support local businesses and what better way to do that than by letting the restaurants show off their best?

Photo source

According to the program’s website, “For fifteen years, Dine Around Seattle has connected tens of thousands of residents with the best of Seattle’s restaurants, contributing millions to our local economy and strengthening our community.”

Dinner at participating restaurants ranges from $22 or $33, to $44 depending on the restaurant and their offering. Chandler’s Crabhouse, Vestal and Flying Fish are all participating,

Dine Around Seattle continues Sunday to Thursday each week through March 23rd, so visit these SLU restaurants and enjoy a discounted meal, while supporting local businesses. Enjoy!

From museum happenings to food and drink events, there’s lots to do next month around the neighborhood…

March 2: First Free Thursday at MOHAI
10am – 8pm | Museum of History and Industry
On the first Thursday of the month, March 2nd, the Museum of History and Industry offers free general admission for the museum’s permanent exhibits – all day long! The free admission includes: True Northwest: the Seattle Journey, and the Bezos Center for Innovation.

March 3: Salish Sea Expeditions, 20 Years of Discovery Seafood Bash
6:30pm – 10pm | Museum of History and Industry
Celebrate 20 years of learning expeditions with Salish Sea Expeditions in a seafood bash on March 3rd. Food is provided by Herban Feast, with libations from local bars, crab races, dessert dash and FUNdraiser in support of 2017 programs. Tickets are $150/person.

March 4: Form Over Function – Ceramic Sculptures Opening Reception
4pm – 7pm | Winston Wachter
Winston Wächter Fine Art Seattle is proud to announce Form Over Function: Ceramic Sculptures by Andrew Casto, Steve Young Lee, Jeffry Mitchell, Zemer Peled, Kim Simonsson and Dirk Staschke. The opening reception is on Saturday, March 4th, 4 – 7 pm. Artists Jeffry Mitchell and Dirk Staschke will be in attendance.

March 7: Taste of Place at MOHAI
7pm – 8:30pm | Museum of History and Industry
With some of the most productive growing regions in the whole world, Washington is one of the best spots for artisanal food and drink. Visit MOHAI on March 7th for a panel discussion, called Taste of Place, to explore the ways that natural phenomena contribute to some of the most specific aromas and flavors from our state. Tickets are $20 for the public, and $15 for MOHAI members. There’s a members-only pre-event happy hour at 5:30 p.m. with door prizes, light hors d’oeuvres, and a no-host bar for an additional fee.

March 17: REI Pinnacle and Pints
6:30pm | South Lake Union REI
Spend an evening of climbing, followed by a pint of beer for REI Pinnacle and Pints night! Start at the Climbing Pinnacle, gear-up (provided), and get some coaching from an REI host/belayer. Close the evening with a short walk to a local bar and REI will pay for the first round of pints and shared appetizers.

March 25: Maker Day – Upcycled Engineering
11am – 2pm | Museum of History and Industry
Bring the family to MOHAI on March 25th for Maker Day: Upcycled Engineering to learn how to use recycled goods to make fun, creative toys with Seattle ReCreative. Ballard Reuse has also made a giant interactive maze from reclaimed building materials to enjoy.

Daniels Broiler, situated on the shores of Lake Union, has been a Seattle landmark of fine dining for what seems like forever. With its sweeping views of Lake Union, Queen Anne and Gasworks Park in addition to its incredible menu of USDA prime steaks and chops, all prepared impeccably, Daniel’s has always been the go-to venue for holiday and celebratory meals, fine craft cocktails and some of the best steaks you’ll ever enjoy.

Recently, people have been up in arms as rumors swirled regarding the possible closing of Daniel’s Lake Union location, due to Vulcan Real Estate’s plans to redevelop the pier on which it sits. Those fears were somewhat put to rest this week when the Seattle Times reported that Daniel’s on Lake Union will not close, but will merely move to a nearby location, still along the shores of South Lake Union. It seems fabulous steaks and sweeping Lake Union vistas will remain on Daniel’s menu for years to come, and we’ll drink to that!

Over the years, Daniel’s Broiler has become a local fine dining legend in the Seattle area, synonymous with delicious, high-end meals, superb craft cocktails, incredible views and live music, outstanding service and a seemingly never ending parade of Seattle’s most interesting and beautiful people to be found on any given night, enjoying a bite or a sip. However, many of us who have grown up in the Seattle area, (particularly those of us under a certain age) know very little of the famed steakhouse’s origins.

Daniel’s has been owned and operated by The Schwartz Brothers Restaurant group since 1981, and has changed very little since its beginnings at the Leschi Marina in 1980, but it’s true roots go much deeper than that. Daniel’s Broiler was started by a man named, well, Daniel, believe it or not. Daniel Jack Sandal, to be specific.

Daniel Sandal, a born and bred Seattleite, grew up in The Emerald City’s Wallingford neighborhood, graduated from the now closed Lincoln High School, and got his start in the food industry at the World-Famous Pike Place Market. Daniel’s Grandfather, Dan Zido, founded “Dan’s Better Meats” in Pike Place Market in 1910, and it was there, (in a space at the market that is now known as the home of Italian favorite, Il Bistro) that Daniel began his love affair with meat, as a third-generation butcher.

Eventually the butcher shop moved upstairs in the market, to where you will now find “Don and Joe’s Meats” (unsurprisingly, Don and Joe are related to Dan, and have kept the family tradition of quality cuts alive in Pike Place). Dan took over the family business when his father retired and decided to expand their wholesale business drastically, with their meats soon being featured at Seattle’s finest restaurant, including Canlis, The Fairmont Olympic Hotel, The Space Needle and plenty more. He also started a daily-delivered, fresh-ground meat patty service for local favorite burger joint, Dick’s Drive-In, helping to make those burgers we all know and love so darn scrumptious.

In the Early 1970’s, Dan began his foray into the restaurant world as a restaurateur himself, co-founding Benjamin’s with partner Arnold Shain. The success of Benjamin’s fueled Dan and Arnold to continue on in the restaurant game, with the opening of The Gasworks Restaurant, but eventually, they parted ways as partners.

In 1980, at the ripe, young age of 40, Daniel decided it was time to start his own place, a place for steaks and chops so terrific, people would fall in love, and that they did. The vision for the original Daniels Broiler was to be Dan’s own take on the fine dining he had grown up with in Seattle, drawing heavy inspiration from places like Canlis, but staying true to the steakhouse theme with top quality steaks and chops consistently available and prepared perfectly.

Daniel’s was a sort of experiment for Dan, as he had only ever opened and operated restaurants with partners prior to Daniel’s Broiler. He was once quoted as saying “I wanted to see if I could do it, I did it on my own so I didn’t have to deal with other’s dreams and problems and wouldn’t be at anyone else’s mercy.” And do it, he did. Daniel’s Broiler became a success from the very beginning, in its original home, located on the glistening shores of Lake Washington in the Leschi Marina.  At the time, this was a convenient location for Mercer Island and Bellevue residents, until they closed the I-90 entrance and exit on the east side of the tunnels when the second bridge was built.  Today, the original Daniel’s location serves the Mount Baker, Leschi, Madrona, Washington Park, Madison Park and Denny Blaine neighborhoods and a slew of long-time customers. 

Since being purchased by the Schwartz Brothers in late 1981, they have made very few changes to Dan Sandal’s original concept for the restaurant. The Schwartz Brothers did expand the Daniel’s brand to include locations in Bellevue (opening in 1989) and the location we all know and love, on the shores of Lake Union (since 1999), where Dan and Arnold’s first venture, Benjamin’s, once lived.

Dan Sandal passed away in 2012, but left behind a much loved and delicious legacy in Daniel’s Broiler. While many people find success in the Seattle restaurant scene, few reach the iconic status of Daniel’s Broiler, nor do they stand the test of time, untarnished and as beloved as ever the way Daniel’s has.

Daniel’s Broiler has been a Seattle staple for over 35 years, in 3 different locations, and it doesn’t appear that that will be changing anytime soon. While the Lake Union location may be moved slightly to make way for the inevitable growth and changes of a bustling city, it’s good to know it won’t be going far.

It’s almost time to lace up those running shoes and sign up for the annual Hot Chocolate 15/5k run! This year’s yummy and fun event kicks off on Sunday, March 5th at Seattle Center How’s that for a great way to spend the first Sunday-Funday of March, both for seasoned runners and first-timers who aren’t afraid of a challenge!

The fun begins bright and early at 6:45a.m. with the 5K and the 15k starts at 7:55a.m. Race participants can expect a fun, well organized and challenging race through the heart of beautiful Downtown Seattle (hills and all!), a fabulous SWAG bag of goodies to take home, of course, delicious chocolate. Talk about motivation to finish strong!

If you’re looking for a fun way to spend your Sunday while getting a great workout, consider signing up for this once-a-year event. The challenge is worth it to get to the Post Race Party where runners will enjoy music, a family friendly environment and a ‘finisher’s mug’ filled with hot chocolate, chocolate fondue and delightfully dippable treats. Don’t count the calories, you will have more than earned this chocolate indulgence!

The Hot Chocolate Run isn’t just a great way to spend a day off. The Hot Chocolate Run is partnered with Ronald McDonald House Charities, helping to provide a home-away-from-home for children and the families of children being treated at Seattle Children’s’ Hospital, at little to no cost to the families. A portion of the proceeds from signing up for this race will go to this outstanding cause, helping to make a real difference in our community.

Not into running or chocolate? That’s fine! But be aware, this race will take place in Downtown Seattle and along many main roads and thoroughfares, so you will want to plan ahead for any travel on that day. Take a look at the map (left) to see the route and read the chart below for a street closure timeline, to help you plan your day.

This event is great to do with friends, family or even by yourself. You’ll probably leave with new friends after a little friendly competition! This event brings together people from all over the city and state, so get out there, mix, mingle and help build a wonderful feeling of community in our fair city. Sprint into Springtime at this fabulous annual event, get a good sweat on and maybe even make some new friends….oh and eat chocolate! Do we really need to sell you on this?

 

For more info on this event, road closures, the post-race party and more, visit the Hot Chocolate Run website here.

 

 

 

Anticipated Road Closures:

Street Closure From To Side of Road Closure Time Anticipated Opening
2nd Ave Thomas St Broad St Whole Road 6:15AM 9:10AM
Broad St 2nd Ave Elliott Ave Westbound 6:15AM 9:15AM
Elliott Ave Broad St SR-99 NB On-Ramp SB One Lane 6:15AM 9:20AM
Elliott Ave SR-99 NB On-Ramp Western Ave Whole Road 6:20AM 9:20AM
Western Ave Elliott Ave Spring St Whole Road 6:20AM 9:40AM
SR-99 Bell St John St NB Lanes 6:15AM 11:15AM
SR-99 Western Ave John St SB Lanes 6:15AM 10:25AM
Aurora Ave Denny Way 45th St NB Lanes 6:15AM 11:15AM
Aurora Ave 38th St Denny Way SB Lanes 6:15AM 10:25AM
Harrison St Aurora Ave Dexter Ave Whole Road 6:25AM 11:15AM
Dexter Ave Harrison St Mercer St SB One Lane 6:25AM 11:15AM
Mercer St Dexter Ave 5th Ave East Bound Lanes 6:25AM 11:20AM
5th Ave Mercer St Thomas Ave SB Lanes 3:00AM 12:00PM
5th Ave Mercer St Thomas Ave NB Lanes 6:25AM 11:25AM

 

According to an American Psychological Association survey, 72 percent of Americans have felt stressed about money within the past month, with half reporting that the stress significantly impacted their quality of sleep.

In fact, another recent study found that four out of five Seattleites believe they would be happier if they felt more confident in their personal finances, over half of are not able to invest more in their passions because of a financial obstacle, and less than one-third feel confident when thinking about their personal finances.* With so many people in our nation, and even our own community, feeling this way, how can we go about mapping out the right path to personal finance success?

Enter Capital One. Through its innovative Capital One Cafés and the “Banking ReimaginedSM Tour” that will be making a stop in Westlake Park this weekend, Capital One is aiming to redesign the banking experience by making things simple, straightforward, and built around empowering people to feel more confident in their relationship with their money.

“Personal finance has evolved with our digital economy,” says Lia Dean, Head of Capital One Cafés. “We want to create experiences that fit more naturally into people’s lives. And that really comes to life in two ways–innovative products and digital tools, and also the human connection we know people still crave.”

Soon, two new Seattle-area Capital One Cafés will open to the public. The Cafes, one located in South Lake Union and another in Bellevue, will join Cafes across the country, including locations in Boston, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Richmond, San Francisco, and St. Cloud, with plans to open in South Florida later this year.

Located at 333 Westlake Avenue, the Capital One Café in South Lake Union will offer more than 12,000 square feet of space for banking, meeting and socializing—with three nooks, two meeting rooms, and four on-premise ATMs. The location at 418 Bellevue Way NE in Bellevue will be 7,800 square feet and also include three nooks, two meeting rooms, and four ATMs. The Capital One Café is a place where people can recharge their bank accounts, devices, and lives while learning new ways to manage their finances, try out new digital and financial tools, or simply grab a great cup of coffee or local pastry.

“Our Capital One Cafés are about solving our visitor’s financial problems and helping them reach their money goals,” Dean adds. “We started the journey two years ago talking to Americans about their money and we learned three big things. First, most of the time they’re banking digitally. Second, while technology makes their money lives easier, it hasn’t solved their stress over their financial lives. And lastly, they don’t know where to turn to relieve that money stress.”

The fact that Capital One has broadened its repertoire into this nontraditional space for banking should come as little surprise. The company has been at the forefront of digital banking since it entered the industry, and the Cafés are one way they are reimagining banking. At the Cafés, customers will be able to learn about award-winning accounts that offer no fees or minimums, while engaging with interactive screens that feature fun, helpful money content and demo bars that showcase the latest digital tools that can help you better manage your money. Capital One is even launching a first-of-its-kind Money Coaching program, a complimentary personalized service designed to connect your values to your money so you can better plan a path for your future financial goals to give you the confidence to make it happen.

Capital One is also launching a ten-market, consumer-facing tour starting this month.

 photo Facebook_Pre-Event_zpszugcbbg3.jpg

The “Banking ReimaginedSM Tour” gives a glimpse of one of the ways Capital One is changing how people think about their money and money goals. Like the Cafés, the tour is designed to connect with and guide consumers along their personal financial journey. The traveling tour will introduce consumers to innovative services and programs designed to deliver financial empowerment in compelling, nontraditional, and technology-forward ways. It features a state-of-the-art, 54-foot trailer housing a smart, personalized and digital experience open to the public, including:

  • Touchscreens that allow you to prioritize personal values and goals, demonstrating how your outlook shapes the way you view money.
  • An augmented reality experience with 3-D holograms in real space and time that brings your financial goals to life. Video selfie booths where you can record a message to your future self as a reminder of your money goals.

In the end, these efforts echo one of Capital One’s core beliefs: Personal finance doesn’t need to be stressful. Both the tour and the Capital One Cafés hope to make that goal a reality.

WHEN: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 17 and 18.

WHERE: Westlake Park 401 Pine St., Seattle.

For more information on the Capital One Banking ReimaginedSM Tour, visit http://bankingreimagined.capitalone.com or tweet @CapitalOneCafe.

*According to a 2017 local market survey fielded by Toluna on behalf of Capital One

Syndicated from SeattleWeekly