Amazon’s New Troy Building Opened Last Week in SLU

By Sarah Anne Lloyd

As Amazon expands their campus downtown—and looks to expand into other cities—they’re still gaining office space in South Lake Union. The latest project to house Amazon offices in the neighborhood, the Troy Building, officially opened last week.

 

Located between Boren and Fairview avenues and Harrison and Thomas streets, the complex includes two towers, one 12-story and the other 13-story, connected by a lower-rise building. The design by architecture firm Perkins+Will incorporates two historic buildings. The first is the project’s namesake, the 1927 Troy Laundry Building, a two-story Beaux Arts structure declared a Seattle landmark in 1996. The second, the Boren Investment Building, is a 1938 warehouse declared a landmark in 2011, just as plans solidified for the Troy Block.

The original buildings are clear from a distance, with the original rooflines and ornamentation preserved. Up close, the brickwork and original window style add a historic touch.

From the top: The façade of the Troy Laundry building between the north and south towers. The reception area of the south building. A flexible seating area in the north building. A meeting area in the north tower.

In addition to the 817,000 square feet that’s going to Amazon offices, the project includes five restaurants by Farestart, a nonprofit that provides job training to people struggling with homelessness, addiction, poverty, or a criminal record.

From the top: The interior of Rise Café by Farestart. Farestart’s Community Table.  The exterior of Maslow’s by Farestart.

The project was started by Seattle-based developer Touchstone, who was purchased by another local developer, Urban Renaissance Group, in 2014.

This massive uptick in office space comes soon after Amazon’s announcement that they’d be taking over all the office space in Seattle’s soon-to-be second-tallest skyscraper, the Rainier Tower. To the north, construction is still underway expanding Amazon’s massive campus surrounding the new Day One building—and the spheres.

Syndicated from Seattle Curbed.

New Seaplane Flights to Link Downtown Seattle to Vancouver via Lake Union

Travellers heading between Seattle and Vancouver could soon shorten their journey, with direct flights between the cities’ downtown cores planned to take off next year.

The service will be run by Vancouver’s Harbour Air and Washington State-based Kenmore Air will include four daily flights between Coal Harbour and Lake Union.

Kenmore Air already offers direct flights between the Seattle lake airport and Victoria’s Inner Harbour.

The proposed Vancouver-Seattle flight path has been nicknamed the “nerd bird” because it links the growing high-tech sectors of both cities. If approved, the new route could begin as early as spring 2018.

In an interview at the Cascadia Innovation Corridor Conference in Seattle, Microsoft president Brad Smith said he’s hopeful for regular seaplane service between the cities within the next year.

“Frankly there was little reason not to have it in place this year,” he told The Canadian Press.

“I think it’s not unreasonable to say we need to move faster in getting that done.”

Smith said he also hopes a plan to build a high-speed train between the cities will come to fruition. Microsoft donated US$50,000 to a feasibility study commissioned by Washington State.

Vancouver’s Microsoft Canada office currently employs 800 workers, and Smith said he sees continuing opportunities for growth north of the border.

He added it “makes sense” for Vancouver to make an effort to woo Amazon.com, based in Seattle and currently looking for a location for its second headquarters.

Syndicated from bc.ctvnews.ca

Crosswalk and Light Added to Much-Used Pedestrian Spot on Denny

by Christine Clarridge

Some brazen South Lake Union pedestrians who have felt the urge to cross Denny Way in the middle of a perilous block have a small but significant reason to celebrate.

The installation of a new traffic light and crosswalk was completed Tuesday morning (August 15th) at Terry Avenue North, meaning pedestrians will no longer have the temptation to take their lives in their hands to cross an unprotected intersection on Denny Way between Boren and Westlake avenues.

Many people would cross the intersection, which separates much of the South Lake Union workforce from public-transit options just to the south, mid-block to avoid walking down to Westlake or up to Fairview.

People so used to crossing the unprotected intersection didn’t seem to even notice the new traffic feature as they loped across Denny, just feet away from the white crosswalk lines, according to Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) spokeswoman Mafara Hobson. But those who noticed have been pleased, she said.

“Everybody has been saying ‘Thank God you did it,’” Hobson said, moments after the traffic light — a project costing the city about $100,000 — was turned on for the first time.

The impetus for the new crossing came from the state’s former secretary of transportation, Douglas MacDonald, who has been on a personal mission to walk many of the city’s streets looking for improvements, according to SDOT Director Scott Kubly. MacDonald reported to the city in January what many South Lake Union employees have been privately griping about for a few years, as the volume of pedestrian traffic in the area has increased dramatically in the booming neighborhood home to Amazon’s urban campus.

Seattle Times publisher Frank Blethen said he’s pleased and relieved by the new crosswalk, which can be seen from the company’s newsroom windows just up the hill.

“I’m shocked we haven’t had an employee that’s been hurt because it’s just too enticing to cross without going up or down the hill,” he said. “This just makes a lot of sense.”
Syndicated from the Seattle Times. Photo credit: Christine Clarridge / The Seattle Times. 

Man Climbs Aurora Bridge to Snap Selfies with July 4th Fireworks over Lake Union

By Scott Greenstone

In an apparent quest for an exclusive view of the July Fourth fireworks show, one man was arrested on investigation of criminal trespassing Tuesday night after scaling the underbelly of the Aurora Bridge, police said.

A little after 9 p.m., Dutch tourist Justin van Schaick saw someone climbing on the girders under the Aurora Bridge, which is more than 160 feet above Lake Union.

“He was carefully sliding from beam to beam and then finally stopped when he was far enough to be able to see the fireworks and took some selfies,” van Schaick said in an email recounting the incident.

Van Schaick snapped photos of the man as he climbed the 160-foot-high steel underbelly of the bridge, illuminated by the sky nearing dusk.

Photo credit: Justin van Schaick

The Seattle Fire Department and police arrived soon after and told the man to come down. According to van Schaick, the man asked authorities whether he could wait until after the fireworks show to come down.

They said no.

“He yelled down to the police at some point: ‘Could you please not make a scene?’ ” van Schaick said, “which was very funny because he was the very reason they were here.”

Upon reaching the ground, the man was arrested and booked into King County Jail on investigation of criminal trespassing, police said. He was released about midnight.

Syndicated from The Seattle Times.

Urban Craft Uprising

Just a few of the makers at the Uprising, left to right: Dolcetta Artisan Sweets, Good and Well Supply Co., Paper Parasol Press, Haute Under The Collar, Estrella Soap Co., Dotted Line Jewelry, Lincoln Hobbs, and Lyonhart Bag Co.

The summer version of the Urban Craft Uprising (there’s a winter show, too) is happening on Saturday June 24th and Sunday June 25th this year. It’s being held at the Seattle Center Exhibition Hall from 11 am to 5 pm, and at the time of this writing, there are currently around 146 indie vendors showcasing their handmade wares at this event.

Tripper Dungan, one of the artists at Urban Craft Uprising

For those who aren’t familiar with this, the Urban Craft Uprising supports independent artists and makers and their creations, by hosting Seattle’s largest craft show of its kind. In the summer, this juried show tends to be a bit quieter than the winter show (perhaps seeking out unique Christmas gifts then), so a good time to check out the event.

Crafts fall under different categories:
art ˖ accessories ˖ baby/kid stuff ˖ bags ˖ candles ˖ bath & body ˖ ceramics ˖ clothing ˖ fiber ˖ food (packaged) ˖ housewares ˖ jewelry ˖ kits & supplies ˖ paper goods ˖ pets ˖ toys

Between shopping for one-of-a-kind gifts, there are eating options as well.  Five different food trucks will be available on the premises.

Urban Craft Uprising
Seattle Center Exhibition Hall
301 Mercer St.
Seattle, WA 98109

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/642220882629399/permalink/683447358506751/