Author

Lake Union Scene

Browsing

By Sydney Parker

Only 3.7% of office space and 1.3% of lab space is available for lease in South Lake Union, leaving much to be desired for any company hoping to settle in the hot neighborhood, JLL reports. To fill this void, Unico and BioMed Realty each put forth proposals for two big office properties in the South Lake Union market.

Seattle-based Unico Properties is planning a six- to eight-story building at 330 Yale Ave. N, according to public records, the Puget Sound Business Journal reports. The site is on the campus of Pemco’s former headquarters, which Unico bought for $51.75M at the end of 2014. Pemco relocated to its new headquarters on the west side of Lake Union in 2015.

The Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce first reported on Unico’s plans for the new building. The report named Perkins+Will as designer.

San Diego-based BioMed Realty hopes to construct a two-tower, 14-story building on the full block at 700 Dexter Ave. N. The project will have nearly 350K SF of office, 26,250 SF of ground-floor retail and restaurant space, and 520 underground parking stalls once completed.

Syndicated from Bisnow.com

By Anca Gaguic

Modera South Lake Union, a 294-unit community located at 435 Dexter Ave. North near Seattle’s downtown, was awarded LEED Silver by the USGBC. The seven-story luxury apartment community is the first Mill Creek Residential property in Seattle to achieve the distinction.

The property was awarded the certification due to a series of green features such as:

  • the use of locally sourced materials
  • reduced construction waste
  • recycled content in materials
  • high-efficiency lighting and plumbing fixtures
  • enhanced waste management system
  • a healthy indoor environment, deemed healthy due to the use of low volatile Organic compounds (VOC) paints, coatings, sealants and adhesives, as well as a continuous, silent ventilation system and safe, formaldehyde-free wall insulation.

To achieve the LEED Silver status the community’s location was factored in too, as it has convenient access to public transit options, several community resources, eateries, job centers and nearby attractions that help limit commute times, thus cutting down on the community’s carbon footprint. In addition, from the early stages of construction, the community has been verified by an independent third-party affiliated with the USGBC.

ABOUT THE COMMUNITY

The unit mix at Modera South Lake Union includes one- to three-bedroom floor plans ranging in size from 444 to 1,144 square feet. Common area amenities include controlled-access garage parking, self-serve package lockers, a pet spa, 24-hour fitness center, clubhouse, game room, rooftop deck, theater and coffee bar. Unit interiors feature air conditioning; wood plank-style flooring; nine-foot ceilings; stainless Energy Star appliances including gas ranges; quartz countertops; USB ports; large closets and full-size washers and dryers.

The community offers easy access to Highway 99 and Interstate 5, and is adjacent to public transit options including the South Lake Union Streetcar, several bus lines and connections to the light rail. Major employers in the area include Amazon, Microsoft, University of Washington Medicine, Gates Foundation and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.

Images courtesy of Mill Creek Residential. Syndicated from CPexecutive.com.

by Christine Clarridge

Some brazen South Lake Union pedestrians who have felt the urge to cross Denny Way in the middle of a perilous block have a small but significant reason to celebrate.

The installation of a new traffic light and crosswalk was completed Tuesday morning (August 15th) at Terry Avenue North, meaning pedestrians will no longer have the temptation to take their lives in their hands to cross an unprotected intersection on Denny Way between Boren and Westlake avenues.

Many people would cross the intersection, which separates much of the South Lake Union workforce from public-transit options just to the south, mid-block to avoid walking down to Westlake or up to Fairview.

People so used to crossing the unprotected intersection didn’t seem to even notice the new traffic feature as they loped across Denny, just feet away from the white crosswalk lines, according to Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) spokeswoman Mafara Hobson. But those who noticed have been pleased, she said.

“Everybody has been saying ‘Thank God you did it,’” Hobson said, moments after the traffic light — a project costing the city about $100,000 — was turned on for the first time.

The impetus for the new crossing came from the state’s former secretary of transportation, Douglas MacDonald, who has been on a personal mission to walk many of the city’s streets looking for improvements, according to SDOT Director Scott Kubly. MacDonald reported to the city in January what many South Lake Union employees have been privately griping about for a few years, as the volume of pedestrian traffic in the area has increased dramatically in the booming neighborhood home to Amazon’s urban campus.

Seattle Times publisher Frank Blethen said he’s pleased and relieved by the new crosswalk, which can be seen from the company’s newsroom windows just up the hill.

“I’m shocked we haven’t had an employee that’s been hurt because it’s just too enticing to cross without going up or down the hill,” he said. “This just makes a lot of sense.”
Syndicated from the Seattle Times. Photo credit: Christine Clarridge / The Seattle Times. 

By Chris Daniels

If you’ve looked around the Lake Union Park in recent years, you’ve noticed quite a few birds.  There’s the geese, the cranes, and one lame duck.

But that duck is about to move again or at least move people.  The city began this week its long delayed work,on a relatively new pedestrian bridge.  The span, just 108-feet long, opened in 2007 and was part of the major renovation that produced the park in 2010.

But just four years later, the bridge was closed.  The city acknowledged later a major mistake was made in the engineering of the east abutment.  The soil settlement was greater than expected, causing the span to move several inches;  however, the city said it didn’t have the money to make the proper repairs.

That was until this past year after the Seattle City Council allocated the money needed.  It will cost $4.3 million to make the fix.

Rachel Schulkin, a spokesperson for the Seattle Parks and Recreation department, says engineers will use a geo-foam to stabilize the soil and reduce further settlement.  She says the plan is for the bridge to be open by 2017.

David Erskine, a volunteer at the Center for Wooden Boats, says he’s looking forward to the reconnection.

“(The Center) are looking for our neighbors to come us, larger populations, and look for respite,“ he said. “We hope to see in a few months that much improved and being a lovely way.”

Syndicated from KING 5 News.

At festivals, fairs, and events across America, The Blue Angels are a quintessential part of summer. These epic aviators create a great spectacle, boost morale, and are something to look forward to for families across the country. From their initial inception to this history behind their name, here are a few things you may not have known about the Blue Angels.

They Were The Second Formal Flying Crew in the World

Formed in the 1940’s to cultivate passion and grow interest in the Navy, The Blue Angels were the world’s second formal flying  aerobatic team. The first was the Patrouille de France, which was the first of its kind formed in 1931. The Blue Angels’ first performance was in Omaha, Nebraska in 1946.

They’re Named After a Nightclub

When deciding on a name for the Blue Angel fleet, the namesake actually came from a New York night club. The original crew was planning a show in NYC and one member saw mention of New York’s famous Blue Angel night club in New Yorker Magazine. They decided to call their crew the Blue Angels, rather than keep their initial name, the Navy Flight Exhibition Team.

They Fly As Close Together as 18 Inches During Formations

While most of us would be skeptical to fly such fast planes in such close proximity to each other, Blue Angel pilots do so with ease In their Diamond 360 maneuver, the planes can be as close to each other as as just a foot and a half.

They Reach Speeds of Up To 700 MPH While Performing

These fast flyers reach up to 700 miles per hour during their performances. That’s about 125 miles per hour faster than the average commercial plane, whose average speed is around 575 miles per hour.

They Fly Themselves to All Shows

While it seems logical for these planes to fly themselves to each destination, flying from coast to coast is no quick trip for any plane. When the crew flew to Hawaii in 2010, they were accompanied by two tankers which refilled each plane ten times during the flight across the Pacific Ocean.

They Were the First U.S. Military Presence over Moscow Since the Cold War

In 2013, the Blue Angels became the first U.S. military planes to see the skies of Moscow since the Cold War. The crew performed on Moscow Day, in honor of the inception of the city.

Their First Female Pilot was Marines Captain Katie Higgins in 2015

It took 70 years for a female pilot to become a member of the Blue Angels, but Katie Higgins joined the team in 2015.

“Little girls have told me that they didn’t even know that ladies can fly aircraft, that women could be in the cockpit,” Captain Higgins told the Independent Journal Review in 2015.

She said she applied for the team not because she wanted to break barriers but because of her passion for flying. She tells anyone who is sceptic of her ability to fly a plane as well as the men to simply watch the demo.

“They can’t tell the difference between mine and the other two pilots on here because I fly it just as well as they do,” she said.

Pilots Must have at least 1,250 tactical jet hours to join the ranks

There is an extremely stringent screening process for all pilots hoping to join the Blue Angels. This includes over Navy and Marine aviators with 1200 tactical jet hours, a stringent interview process, and more.

They have performed for over 500 million people

Since their inception in the 1940’s, the Blue Angels have performed for over 500 million people. With summer shows across the country and performances in countries around the world, these planes are a well-loved attraction for people of all kinds.

They’re Coming Soon to Lake Union

Its summertime, and that means it’s show season for the Blue Angels. During Seafair Weekend, August 4-6, they will preform a daily show at 1:40 p.m. Don’t miss your chance to see them!

Featured Source: Jkconnectors.com

Image courtesy of Pixabay.com.

By Monica Nickelsburg

Amazon Music will host a “Prime Day mini music festival” in its backyard today.

Pop-punk band All Time Low will perform at Seattle’s South Lake Union Discovery Center near Amazon’s HQ. The Treasure Truck, Amazon’s deals on wheels promotion that rolls around town offering flash sales, will also be at the event.

Amazon’s patented Treasure Truck is a decked out delivery vehicle offering flash deals on everything from Dungeness crab to cameras. Outside of a trip to the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the truck stays close to home in Seattle — for now.

The show is part of Amazon’s third annual Prime Day shopping event. Today, Amazon is offering a wide range of deals for Prime members. Today’s event is the second time the Treasure Truck has been associated with a concert. Amazon held a similar event during last year’s Prime Day.

Gates for the event open at 11:30 a.m. and All Time Low will start playing around noon.

Syndicated from GeekWire.com

By Scott Greenstone

In an apparent quest for an exclusive view of the July Fourth fireworks show, one man was arrested on investigation of criminal trespassing Tuesday night after scaling the underbelly of the Aurora Bridge, police said.

A little after 9 p.m., Dutch tourist Justin van Schaick saw someone climbing on the girders under the Aurora Bridge, which is more than 160 feet above Lake Union.

“He was carefully sliding from beam to beam and then finally stopped when he was far enough to be able to see the fireworks and took some selfies,” van Schaick said in an email recounting the incident.

Van Schaick snapped photos of the man as he climbed the 160-foot-high steel underbelly of the bridge, illuminated by the sky nearing dusk.

Photo credit: Justin van Schaick

The Seattle Fire Department and police arrived soon after and told the man to come down. According to van Schaick, the man asked authorities whether he could wait until after the fireworks show to come down.

They said no.

“He yelled down to the police at some point: ‘Could you please not make a scene?’ ” van Schaick said, “which was very funny because he was the very reason they were here.”

Upon reaching the ground, the man was arrested and booked into King County Jail on investigation of criminal trespassing, police said. He was released about midnight.

Syndicated from The Seattle Times.

By Lisa Stiffler

The nonprofit FareStart announced today that the five restaurants and cafes that it’s launching with Amazon’s help will be ready to open their doors next month.

The eateries, in Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood, will provide training opportunities for FareStart’s Foodservice Apprenticeship Program, a new initiative to help train entry-level employees in food services. The goal of the program is to assist low-income food-service employees into higher-paying jobs in the restaurant industry.

Earlier this year, Amazon donated equipment and 25,000 square feet of space to the nonprofit for the restaurants, which will be open to the public.

FareStart Rendering

The venues will include Maslow’s, described as a full-service casual restaurant and bar with regionally-sourced ingredients; Community Table, offering “a market-like dining experience” that will be home to three casual eateries — one serving BBQ, one featuring made-to-order salads and another offering seasonal vegetables served in bowls with grains; and Rise, an Italian-themed coffee shop with pastries and sandwiches.

Founded 30 years ago, FareStart provides food for those in need and offers training in food-service and barista jobs for people who struggle to find employment because of homelessness, poverty and other challenges. The nonprofit reports that 90 percent of adults who graduate from their training program find work within three months.

“The new eateries will provide greater dining options in the growing South Lake Union neighborhood while advancing the skills of entry-level food-service workers and providing pathways to living wage jobs,” said Wayne Johnson, FareStart’s corporate executive chef. “We look forward to inviting the entire community to join us as we transform lives.”

The partnership with FareStart aligns with multiple efforts by Amazon to support homeless people in the Seattle area. Last month the online retail and cloud services giant announced that it would open a homeless transitional shelter inside one of its new Seattle HQ buildings. The 47,000 square-foot shelter will give 65 families a place to stay while seeking permanent housing. The facility will open in early 2020 and be run by Mary’s Place, a nonprofit that supports homeless families. Mary’s Place is currently operating a temporary shelter in an Amazon-owned building that is slated for demolition.

Maslow’s will be located at 380 Boren Ave N. in Seattle while Community Table and Rise will open in Amazon’s Houdini North building at 399 Fairview Ave N.

Syndicated from GeekWire.com

By Marco Kronen with Seattle Condo Review: A guide to Seattle downtown condos.

According to the Puget Sound Business Journal, the Developer of the lot in South Lake Union where Shilla Restaurant sits at 2300 8th Ave, will be developed as condominiums, at least that is the plan for now. The small triangular lot across from Denny Park is being developed by Bellevue-based North American Seattle Development LLC, which is affiliated with a company out of China.

The building will be 39 stories with 286 residential units. The plan today is to build condos but the developer is keeping their options open to see how the market is looking closer to the time when they will begin construction on the project, which is currently unknown and dependent on when the city approves their master use permit. The estimation is that the earliest they could start construction would be summer of 2018.

Rendering source: Caron architecture firm

Syndicated from SeattlePI.com

by Kate Calamusa

STROLLER ALONG

In my humble opinion, South Lake Union is best toured by the Seattle Streetcar. Pick up the cheery little trolley at the Westlake Avenue and Olive Way stop in Downtown Seattle and then hop on and hop off as you please. Stops of note include the Westlake Avenue North and Denny Way, which will drop you in front of Tutta Bella (see below), where you can enjoy some pizza on the deck if it’s a sunny day. Another is at the intersection of Terry Avenue North and Harrison Street. There you’ll find Ping Pong Plaza, outfitted with an outdoor bronze-and-steel Ping-Pong table for all to enjoy; plan ahead and BYOP (bring your own paddlesand balls). End your streetcar trip at Lake Union Park (860 Terry Ave. N; 206-684-4075), a lovely spot to hang after your ride. It offers an expansive lakefront lawn to roam, plus a spray pad to cool off in during the summer months.

SNACK BREAK

Time to cast your vote. Breakfast means making a tough choice between a stacked biscuit sammich from chef Tom Douglas’s Serious Pie and Biscuit (401 Westlake Ave. N; 206-436-0050) or the fully loaded toppings barstocked with fresh fruit, whipped cream, and syrups for your waffle or pancakesat Portage Bay Cafe (391 Terry Ave. N; 206-462-6400). Whichever side loses the breakfast battle can pick between LunchBox Laboratory (1253 Thomas St.; 206-621-1090) and Blue Moon Burgers (920 Republican St.; 206-652-0400) later in the day; both eateries offer up big beefy burgers and creative toppings. 

PLAY DATE

Kids can wiggle, giggle, dance, and jiggle at PlayDate SEA (1275 Mercer St.; 206-623-7529), an 8,000-square-foot indoor play space in this hood. With slides and tunnels,plus a dancing area, toddler section, laser tag, and even puppet shows, this spot is nice for parents too,with a café that offers Stumptown coffee and free Wi-Fi.

Tutta Bella Neapolitan Pizzeria
2200 Westlake Ave., Suite 112
206-624-4422
$$$

Specializing in authentic Naples-style pizzas, Tutta Bella immediately offers parents a helping hand by handing pizza dough to little ones to play with in addition to Wikki Stix or crayons and coloring pages.Kids will also get a kick out of their own personal-size Bambino pizza ($6), arriving crisp and lightly charred from the wood-burning oven, with melted provolone and mozzarella cheeses. Psstwith the exception of the Bellevue location, the pizzerias all boast beautiful patios for alfresco dining.

*(c)2017 by Kate Calamusa. All rights reserved. Excerpted from Seattle Family Adventures by permission of Sasquatch Books.