New Seaplane Flights to Link Downtown Seattle to Vancouver via Lake Union

Travellers heading between Seattle and Vancouver could soon shorten their journey, with direct flights between the cities’ downtown cores planned to take off next year.

The service will be run by Vancouver’s Harbour Air and Washington State-based Kenmore Air will include four daily flights between Coal Harbour and Lake Union.

Kenmore Air already offers direct flights between the Seattle lake airport and Victoria’s Inner Harbour.

The proposed Vancouver-Seattle flight path has been nicknamed the “nerd bird” because it links the growing high-tech sectors of both cities. If approved, the new route could begin as early as spring 2018.

In an interview at the Cascadia Innovation Corridor Conference in Seattle, Microsoft president Brad Smith said he’s hopeful for regular seaplane service between the cities within the next year.

“Frankly there was little reason not to have it in place this year,” he told The Canadian Press.

“I think it’s not unreasonable to say we need to move faster in getting that done.”

Smith said he also hopes a plan to build a high-speed train between the cities will come to fruition. Microsoft donated US$50,000 to a feasibility study commissioned by Washington State.

Vancouver’s Microsoft Canada office currently employs 800 workers, and Smith said he sees continuing opportunities for growth north of the border.

He added it “makes sense” for Vancouver to make an effort to woo Amazon.com, based in Seattle and currently looking for a location for its second headquarters.

Syndicated from bc.ctvnews.ca

Two Firms Propose Plans for Necessary Office Space in SLU

By Sydney Parker

Only 3.7% of office space and 1.3% of lab space is available for lease in South Lake Union, leaving much to be desired for any company hoping to settle in the hot neighborhood, JLL reports. To fill this void, Unico and BioMed Realty each put forth proposals for two big office properties in the South Lake Union market.

Seattle-based Unico Properties is planning a six- to eight-story building at 330 Yale Ave. N, according to public records, the Puget Sound Business Journal reports. The site is on the campus of Pemco’s former headquarters, which Unico bought for $51.75M at the end of 2014. Pemco relocated to its new headquarters on the west side of Lake Union in 2015.

The Seattle Daily Journal of Commerce first reported on Unico’s plans for the new building. The report named Perkins+Will as designer.

San Diego-based BioMed Realty hopes to construct a two-tower, 14-story building on the full block at 700 Dexter Ave. N. The project will have nearly 350K SF of office, 26,250 SF of ground-floor retail and restaurant space, and 520 underground parking stalls once completed.

Syndicated from Bisnow.com

Luxury Apartment Building Awarded LEED Silver

By Anca Gaguic

Modera South Lake Union, a 294-unit community located at 435 Dexter Ave. North near Seattle’s downtown, was awarded LEED Silver by the USGBC. The seven-story luxury apartment community is the first Mill Creek Residential property in Seattle to achieve the distinction.

The property was awarded the certification due to a series of green features such as:

  • the use of locally sourced materials
  • reduced construction waste
  • recycled content in materials
  • high-efficiency lighting and plumbing fixtures
  • enhanced waste management system
  • a healthy indoor environment, deemed healthy due to the use of low volatile Organic compounds (VOC) paints, coatings, sealants and adhesives, as well as a continuous, silent ventilation system and safe, formaldehyde-free wall insulation.

To achieve the LEED Silver status the community’s location was factored in too, as it has convenient access to public transit options, several community resources, eateries, job centers and nearby attractions that help limit commute times, thus cutting down on the community’s carbon footprint. In addition, from the early stages of construction, the community has been verified by an independent third-party affiliated with the USGBC.

ABOUT THE COMMUNITY

The unit mix at Modera South Lake Union includes one- to three-bedroom floor plans ranging in size from 444 to 1,144 square feet. Common area amenities include controlled-access garage parking, self-serve package lockers, a pet spa, 24-hour fitness center, clubhouse, game room, rooftop deck, theater and coffee bar. Unit interiors feature air conditioning; wood plank-style flooring; nine-foot ceilings; stainless Energy Star appliances including gas ranges; quartz countertops; USB ports; large closets and full-size washers and dryers.

The community offers easy access to Highway 99 and Interstate 5, and is adjacent to public transit options including the South Lake Union Streetcar, several bus lines and connections to the light rail. Major employers in the area include Amazon, Microsoft, University of Washington Medicine, Gates Foundation and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.

Images courtesy of Mill Creek Residential. Syndicated from CPexecutive.com.

Crosswalk and Light Added to Much-Used Pedestrian Spot on Denny

by Christine Clarridge

Some brazen South Lake Union pedestrians who have felt the urge to cross Denny Way in the middle of a perilous block have a small but significant reason to celebrate.

The installation of a new traffic light and crosswalk was completed Tuesday morning (August 15th) at Terry Avenue North, meaning pedestrians will no longer have the temptation to take their lives in their hands to cross an unprotected intersection on Denny Way between Boren and Westlake avenues.

Many people would cross the intersection, which separates much of the South Lake Union workforce from public-transit options just to the south, mid-block to avoid walking down to Westlake or up to Fairview.

People so used to crossing the unprotected intersection didn’t seem to even notice the new traffic feature as they loped across Denny, just feet away from the white crosswalk lines, according to Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) spokeswoman Mafara Hobson. But those who noticed have been pleased, she said.

“Everybody has been saying ‘Thank God you did it,’” Hobson said, moments after the traffic light — a project costing the city about $100,000 — was turned on for the first time.

The impetus for the new crossing came from the state’s former secretary of transportation, Douglas MacDonald, who has been on a personal mission to walk many of the city’s streets looking for improvements, according to SDOT Director Scott Kubly. MacDonald reported to the city in January what many South Lake Union employees have been privately griping about for a few years, as the volume of pedestrian traffic in the area has increased dramatically in the booming neighborhood home to Amazon’s urban campus.

Seattle Times publisher Frank Blethen said he’s pleased and relieved by the new crosswalk, which can be seen from the company’s newsroom windows just up the hill.

“I’m shocked we haven’t had an employee that’s been hurt because it’s just too enticing to cross without going up or down the hill,” he said. “This just makes a lot of sense.”
Syndicated from the Seattle Times. Photo credit: Christine Clarridge / The Seattle Times. 

$4.3 Million Repair Job on the South Lake Union Bridge Starts

By Chris Daniels

If you’ve looked around the Lake Union Park in recent years, you’ve noticed quite a few birds.  There’s the geese, the cranes, and one lame duck.

But that duck is about to move again or at least move people.  The city began this week its long delayed work,on a relatively new pedestrian bridge.  The span, just 108-feet long, opened in 2007 and was part of the major renovation that produced the park in 2010.

But just four years later, the bridge was closed.  The city acknowledged later a major mistake was made in the engineering of the east abutment.  The soil settlement was greater than expected, causing the span to move several inches;  however, the city said it didn’t have the money to make the proper repairs.

That was until this past year after the Seattle City Council allocated the money needed.  It will cost $4.3 million to make the fix.

Rachel Schulkin, a spokesperson for the Seattle Parks and Recreation department, says engineers will use a geo-foam to stabilize the soil and reduce further settlement.  She says the plan is for the bridge to be open by 2017.

David Erskine, a volunteer at the Center for Wooden Boats, says he’s looking forward to the reconnection.

“(The Center) are looking for our neighbors to come us, larger populations, and look for respite,“ he said. “We hope to see in a few months that much improved and being a lovely way.”

Syndicated from KING 5 News.